Iresine P. Browne
  • Civ. Nat. Hist. Jamaica 358–359. 1756. (10 Mar 1756)
  • Bloodleaf [Greek eiresione, a wreath or staff entwined with strips of wool, alluding to the long woolly hairs often encircling the calyx]


Cite taxon page as 'WFO (2020): Iresine P. Browne. Published on the Internet;http://www.worldfloraonline.org/taxon/wfo-4000019176. Accessed on: 18 Feb 2020'

General Information

Herbs erect or climbing subshrubs. Leaves opposite, margin entire or serrate. Flowers perfect or unisexual on different plants, very small, solitary or clustered in spikes and again arranged into complex thyrsoid structures. Bracts and bracteoles often shiny, membranous. Tepals 5, membranous, long hairy or nearly glabrous, base not rigid. Stamens 5; pseudostaminodes very small or absent in female flowers. Ovary compressed; style very short or absent; stigmas 2, rarely 3, subulate; ovule 1, pendulous. Utricles globose, compressed, indehiscent. Seeds shiny, lenticular or reniform.

  • Provided by: [H].Flora Of CHina @ efloras.org
    • Source: [
    • 3
    • ]. 

    IRESINE P. Browne

    Hierbas, arbustos, bejucos, a veces árboles pequeños, anuales o perennes, tallos erectos, escandentes o trepadores, tallos y ramas glabros, pubescentes o a veces densamente vellosos, con tricomas simples o a veces ramificados; plantas dioicas, ginodioicas o hermafroditas. Hojas opuestas, angostamente decurrentes sobre el pecíolo, glabras, escasa o densamente pubescentes, a veces densamente vellosas, indumento frecuentemente más denso en el envés, los tricomas simples, rectos o irregularmente doblados, a veces ramificados; pecioladas. Inflorescencias compuestas 2–4 veces ramificadas, flores solitarias, básicamente en espigas compactas o espigas alargadas, el sistema de ramificación simétrico y racemoso o desplazado y entonces paniculiforme, terminal en los tallos y las ramas, flores pistiladas, estaminadas o bisexuales, las flores unisexuales generalmente con órganos reducidos del sexo opuesto, bráctea, bractéolas y tépalos en las flores estaminadas y pistiladas de las especies dioicas ligera o conspicuamente diferentes, brácteas ovadas, suborbiculares o redondeado-triangulares, redondeadas, agudas, mucronadas o acuminadas en el ápice, glabras o pubescentes con tricomas cortos y simples, bractéolas obviamente más cortas, iguales o ligeramente más largas que la flor, triangulares, ovadas, rómbicas u orbiculares, redondeadas, mucronadas o acuminadas en el ápice, glabras o muy escasamente pubescentes con tricomas simples y cortos, cresta ausente; tépalos 5, lanceolados, ovados u oblongos, frecuentemente cimbiformes, libres en la base, membranáceos o escariosos, glabros o pubescentes con tricomas simples, cortos y frecuentemente encorvados, (1–) 3–5-nervios; flores pistiladas o bisexuales con un fascículo de tricomas rectos ("tricomas basales) de hasta 2.5 veces la longitud de la flor, surgiendo abaxialmente desde el tépalo y el pedicelo de la flor; estambres 5, filamentos angostamente lineares o gradualmente ensanchándose hacia la base, connados en la base o unidos en un tubo corto, sin lobos, membranáceos, cremas o amarillentos, anteras uniloculares; pseudoestaminodios presentes o ausentes, triangulares, enteros, marcadamente más cortos que la parte libre del filamento; ovario 1-ovulado, estilo muy cortou obsoleto o delgado y alargado, estigmas con 2 ramas filiformes o cilíndricas, generalmente amarillentos. Fruto un utrículo subgloboso, membranáceo e indehiscente; semilla cocleado-orbicular o gruesamente lenticular, lisa o algo labrada, lustrosa, arilo ausente; flor cayendo junto con las bractéolas en la madurez.

    Un género americano con ca 40 especies distribuidas desde el sur de los Estados Unidos hasta Sudamérica y en las Antillas, más diverso en ambientes secos; 5 especies se conocen en Nicaragua y una sexta especie es seguramente cultivada.

  • Provided by: [F].Flora de Nicaragua
    • Source: [
    • 4
    • ]. 

    Flowers perfect, polygamous or dioecious, bracteate and bibracteolate, subsessile in spikes or glomes. Sepals 5, discrete, hypogynous, concave, subequal, becoming scariose, often with conspicuous tufts of hairs between the sepals and the bracteoles. Stamens 5, the filaments flattened and united below into an entire or appendiculate tube; anthers bilocellate, oblong, introrse, medially attached. Ovary I-locular, 1- ovulate; ovule campylotropous on an elongate flattened funicle; stigmata 2-3, filiform or deltoid. Fruit an indehiscent utricle; seeds cochleate-orbiculate, whitish or reddish brown, smooth. Glabrous to copiously pubescent herbs, shrubs, trees or clambering vines. Leaves opposite, entire to denticulate, petiolate, glabrous to sericeous, herbaceous to coriaceous. Inflorescences of spikes or glomes, paniculately disposed, the branching alternate, opposite or verticillate.

  • Provided by: [G].Flora de Panama
    • Source: [
    • 5
    • ]. 

    Herbs, shrubs or vines, annual or perennial, polygamous or dioecious. Stems erect to prostrate, often trailing. Leaves opposite or alternate, petiolate; blade elliptic, ovate, or lanceolate to lance-oblong, margins entire or serrulate, glabrous or pubescent. Inflorescences terminal, diffuse, open panicles of spikes and axillary spikes; bracts and bracteoles membranous. Flowers unisexual; tepals 5, basally connate or distinct, 1-3-veined; stamens mostly 5; filaments connate basally; anthers 2-locular; pseudostaminodes absent or short; ovule 1; style 1, ca. 0.2 mm; stigmas 2-3, slender or capitate. Utricles globose, membranous, dehiscing irregularly. Seeds 1, dark red or reddish-brown, lenticular. x = 15.

  • Provided by: [E].Flora of North America @ efloras.org
    • Source: [
    • 6
    • ]. 

    "Fls perfect or unisexual, the plants then variously polygamous to monoecious to dioecious; cal deeply 5-parted; stamens 5; filaments connate at base; anthers bisporangiate and unilocular; ovary compressed; style very short; stigmas usually filiform; ovule 1; utricle compressed, membranous, indehiscent; herbs or shrubs with opposite, petiolate lvs and small or minute fls in spikes or aggregated into panicles. 70, irregular."

  • Provided by: [D].New York Botanical Garden
    • Source: [
    • 7
    • ]. 

    Morphology

    Flowers androgynous, polygamous or dioecious, bibracteolate, inflorescence frequently paniculate

  • Provided by: [C].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 2
    • ]. 

    Ovary with a single pendulous ovule; stigmas 2 3, elongate, or sometimes capitate in functionally ♂ flowers

  • Provided by: [C].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 2
    • ]. 

    Capsule membranous, indehiscent

  • Provided by: [C].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 2
    • ]. 

    Perianth-segments 5, free, frequently pilose or lanate

  • Provided by: [C].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 2
    • ]. 

    Stamens 5, shortly monadelphous at the base; pseudostaminodes occasionally well developed, more commonly short or obsolete; anthers unilocular

  • Provided by: [C].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 2
    • ]. 

    Embryo annular, endosperm present.

  • Provided by: [C].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 2
    • ]. 

    Leaves simple, entire or ± incised

  • Provided by: [C].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 2
    • ]. 

    Annual or perennial herbs, shrubs or subshrubs, sometimes scandent, rarely small trees, with opposite leaves and branches

  • Provided by: [C].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 2
    • ]. 

    Distribution

    This heterogeneous genus, of some forty species, is largely if not wholly native to the Americas.

  • Provided by: [G].Flora de Panama
    • Source: [
    • 5
    • ]. 

    Literature

    SELECTED REFERENCE

    Henrickson, J. and S. D. Sundberg. 1986. On the submersion of Dicraurus into Iresine (Amaranthaceae). Aliso 11: 355-364.

  • Provided by: [E].Flora of North America @ efloras.org
    • Source: [
    • 6
    • ]. 

    Other Local Names

    NameLanguageCountry
    Bloodleaf [Greek eiresione, a wreath or staff entwined with strips of wool, alluding to the long woolly hairs often encircling the calyx]

     Information From

    Amaranthaceae
    World Flora Online Data. 2017.
    • A CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).
    MBG Floras Images
    http://www.tropicos.org/ImageSearch.aspx
    Flora images. Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed on Jun. 2018.
    • B Missouri Botanical Garden
    Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    https://www.kew.org/science/who-we-are-and-what-we-do/strategic-outputs-2020/plants-of-the-world-online
    http://www.plantsoftheworldonline.org/terms-and-conditions
    • C
    New York Botanical Garden
    Descriptions of plants should be attributed to the full citation for each individual article, chapter or book that is the source for each record, which should include the authors of original publication.
    • D Content licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
    Flora of North America @ efloras.org
    http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1
    'Flora of North America @ eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1 [accessed August 2016]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
    • E Flora of North America Association
    Flora de Nicaragua
    http://www.tropicos.org/projectwebportal.aspx?projectid=7&pagename=Home&langid=66
    WD Stevens, CU Ulloa, A Pool and OM Montiel. Missouri Botanical Garden Press, 2001
    • F Missouri Botanical Garden
    Flora de Panama
    http://www.tropicos.org/Project/PAC
    Robert E. Woodson, Jr. and Robert W. Schery Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden Vol. 67, No. 4 (1980), pp. ii-xxxiii
    • G Missouri Botanical Garden
    Flora Of CHina @ efloras.org
    http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=2
    'Flora of China @ eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=2 [accessed August 2016]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
    • H Missouri Botanical Garden
    World Flora Online consortium
    http://www.worldfloraonline.org/organisation/WFO
    World Flora Online Data. 2018.
    • I CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).