Atriplex L.
  • Sp. Pl. 2: 1052. 1753. (1 May 1753)
  • Orach, saltbush [ancient Latin name]


Cite taxon page as 'WFO (2020): Atriplex L. Published on the Internet;http://www.worldfloraonline.org/taxon/wfo-4000003611. Accessed on: 18 Feb 2020'

General Information

Herbs annual or perennial, subshrubs, or shrubs, usually furfuraceous. Leaves alternate, rarely opposite, petiolate or subsessile; leaf blade flattened, slightly succulent, linear, lanceolate, oblong, ovate, triangular, rhombic, or hastate, margin serrate, rarely entire. Flowers unisexual (plants monoecious or dioecious), borne in axillary glomerules arranged in panicles or short, leafy spikes. Male flowers ebracteate; perianth (3-)5-parted; segments oblong or obovate, apex obtuse; stamens 3-5, inserted at base of perianth; filaments usually united proximally; ovary rudimentary, conic or terete, rarely obsolete. Female flowers: bractlets 2, free or margins connate to varying lengths, slightly enlarged in fruit (here termed “fruiting bracts”), shape various, both sides usually with appendages; perianth and disk absent; ovary ovoid or globose; style very short; stigmas 2, subulate or filamentous. Utricle enclosed by fruiting bracts; pericarp adnate to seed. Seed vertical, compressed, compressed globose, or lenticular; testa membranous, leathery, or crustaceous; embryo annular; radicle lateral or superior; perisperm surrounded by embryo.

  • Provided by: [D].Flora Of CHina @ efloras.org
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    Herbs or shrubs, annual or perennial, monoecious or dioecious, often with bladderlike hairs that collapse to form silvery or scurfy (mealy) vesture, less often with elongate trichomes. Leaves persistent or tardily deciduous, alternate, partially opposite, or opposite, sessile or petiolate; blade entire, serrate, or lobed, with venation either of Kranz-type or normal dicotyledonous type, axillary buds inconspicuous or lacking. Inflorescences axillary or terminal; flowers borne in axillary clusters or glomerules, or in terminal spikes or spicate panicles. Staminate flowers with 3-5-parted calyx, ebracteate; stamens 3-5. Pistillate flowers lacking perianth, pistil naked, or in few species with (1-)3-5-lobed perianth, commonly enclosed within pair of foliaceous bracteoles; stigmas 2. Fruiting bracteoles enlarged in fruit, of various shapes and variously connate or not, thickened, and appendaged; pericarp free, tightly enclosed in the fruiting bracteoles. Seeds flattened, mainly vertical; radicle inferior, lateral, or superior. x = 9.

  • Provided by: [C].Flora of North America @ efloras.org
    • Source: [
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    "Monoecious; staminate fls with 3–5 sep and as many stamens; pistillate fls all or mostly enclosed individually by 2 broad bracteoles, without perianth except in no. 2 [Atriplex arenaria Nutt.]; ovary wall very thin; styles 2, filiform; embryo annular, the radicle variously inferior (near the base, and directed downward or horizontally) to median (lateral, directed upwards) or superior (near the summit, and directed upwards); annual (incl. all our spp.) or perennial herbs or shrubs; fls minute, sessile or short-pedicellate in glomerules or borne singly in the axils or in terminal spikes or panicles; lvs usually opposite below and alternate above, ± mealy at least when young, sometimes later green and glabrate. Spp. 3–6 form a morphologically confluent, mostly self-pollinated polyploid series, whose members are sharply distinct at some but not all points of contact. 100+, widespread."

  • Provided by: [F].New York Botanical Garden
    • Source: [
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    Morphology

    Embryo annular, with inferior radicle pointing upwards or upwards and outwards.

  • Provided by: [B].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
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    Seeds almost always “vertical”(i.e. laterally compressed), testa commonly thin and hard.

  • Provided by: [B].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 3
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    Fruits enclosed by the persistent accrescent, and often modified bracteoles, with a membranous indehiscent pericarp.

  • Provided by: [B].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 3
    • ]. 

    Annual or perennial herbs or shrubs, usually (always in the Flora Zambesiaca area) more or less mealy with vesicular hairs.

  • Provided by: [B].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 3
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    Female flowers with 2 relatively large bracteoles, without perianth or staminodes.

  • Provided by: [B].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 3
    • ]. 

    Endosperm present.

  • Provided by: [B].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 3
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    Leaves alternate, rarely opposite, mostly petiolate, normally relatively broad and flat.

  • Provided by: [B].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 3
    • ]. 

    Flowers in clusters, which are axillary or aggregated into terminal panicles or spikes, monoecious or dioecious.

  • Provided by: [B].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 3
    • ]. 

    Male flowers without bracteoles, with a 3–5 lobed perianth and 3–5 stamens.

  • Provided by: [B].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 3
    • ]. 

    Leaves alternate, rarely opposite, mostly petiolate, normally broad

  • Provided by: [E].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 4
    • ]. 

    Annual or perennial herbs or shrubs, usually more or less mealy with vesicular hairs

  • Provided by: [E].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 4
    • ]. 

    Endosperm present.  Brackish or saline soil indicators.

  • Provided by: [E].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 4
    • ]. 

    Fruits enclosed by the persistent accrescent and often modified bracteoles, with a membranous indehiscent pericarp

  • Provided by: [E].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 4
    • ]. 

    Flowers in clusters, which are axillary or aggregated into terminal panicles or spikes, monoecious or dioecious.♂ flowers without bracteoles, with a 3–5-lobed calyx and 3–5 stamens; ♀ flowers with 2 relatively large bracteoles, without calyx or staminodes

  • Provided by: [E].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 4
    • ]. 

    Embryo annular with inferior radicle pointing upwards or upwards and outwards

  • Provided by: [E].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 4
    • ]. 

    Seeds almost always “vertical” (i.e. laterally compressed), testa commonly thin and hard

  • Provided by: [E].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 4
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    Literature

    SELECTED REFERENCES

    Bassett, I. J., C. W. Crompton, J. McNeill, and P. M. Taschereau. 1983. The Genus Atriplex (Chenopodiaceae) in Canada. Ottawa. [Agricu. Canada Monogr. 31.] Brown, G. D. 1956. Taxonomy of American Atriplex. Amer. Midl. Naturalist 55: 199-210. Hall, H. M. and F. E. Clements. 1923. The phylogenetic method in taxonomy: The North American species of Artemisia, Chrysothamnus, and Atriplex. Publ. Carnegie Inst. Wash. 326. Hanson, C. A. 1962. Perennial Atriplex of Utah and the Northern Deserts. M.S. thesis. Brigham Young University. McNeill, J., I. J. Bassett, C. W. Crompton, and P. M. Taschereau. 1983. Taxonomic and nomenclatural notes on Atriplex L. (Chenopodiaceae). Taxon 32: 549-556. Taschereau, P. M. 1972. Taxonomy and distribution of Atriplex species in Nova Scotia. Canad. J. Bot. 50: 1571-1594. Turesson, G. 1925. Studies in the genus Atriplex. Acta Univ. Lund, n. s. 21: 1-15. Welsh, S. L. 1995. Names and types of perennial Atriplex Linnaeus (Chenopodiaceae) in North America selectively exclusive of Mexico. Great Basin Naturalist 55: 322-334.

  • Provided by: [C].Flora of North America @ efloras.org
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    • 6
    • ]. 

    Included Species

    Synonyms

    Other Local Names

    NameLanguageCountry
    Orach, saltbush [ancient Latin name]

     Information From

    Amaranthaceae
    World Flora Online Data. 2017.
    • A CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).
    Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    https://www.kew.org/science/who-we-are-and-what-we-do/strategic-outputs-2020/plants-of-the-world-online
    http://www.plantsoftheworldonline.org/terms-and-conditions
    • B
    Flora of North America @ efloras.org
    http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1
    'Flora of North America @ eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1 [accessed August 2016]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
    • C Flora of North America Association
    Flora Of CHina @ efloras.org
    http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=2
    'Flora of China @ eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=2 [accessed August 2016]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
    • D Missouri Botanical Garden
    Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    https://www.kew.org/science/who-we-are-and-what-we-do/strategic-outputs-2020/plants-of-the-world-online
    http://www.plantsoftheworldonline.org/terms-and-conditions
    • E
    New York Botanical Garden
    Descriptions of plants should be attributed to the full citation for each individual article, chapter or book that is the source for each record, which should include the authors of original publication.
    • F Content licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
    World Flora Online consortium
    http://www.worldfloraonline.org/organisation/WFO
    World Flora Online Data. 2018.
    • G CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).